Guiding Agriculture Into the Digital Age

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The digital transformation continues to upend industries and connect the world in new and innovative ways. But one industry remained untouched until recently: agriculture.


In this episode, we’re joined by Praveen Penmetsa, CEO/Founder of Monarch Tractor & Motivo, to discuss how he’s revolutionizing the agriculture industry by bringing automation and connectivity to farms around the world.

Topics that we covered:

- Transforming a stagnant industry

- Challenges of working in an agricultural environment

- The merits of a modular vs. a non-modular approach to product development

- How connected devices will change our lives in meaningful ways

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I do not understand why, in this dayand age, our products are so tightly integrated right that we are limited by what that productcomes out of the box way. You are listening to over the air ioftconnected devices and the journey brought to you by very in each episode. We have sharpunsiltered conversations with executives about their IOT journeys,the mistakes they made, the lessons they learned and what they wish they'dknown when they started everybody welcome back to over the AirIot connected devices and the journey today we're going to be talking aboutautonomous vehicles in an agricultural environment, we're talking aboutelectric autonomous tractors. You guys, I'm here today with Pervin Pinmeza, theCEO of monarch, tractor Pirvine. Welcome to the show, thanks for havingme Ryan, all right, so right off the bat most people listening out there.You know we got IOT super fans, we got connected device folks, but they maynot know monarch tractor. She tells s a little bit about what you guys aredoing. So Mon OP tractor is very much next generation tool for farmers, soour tractor is all electric. It is capable of driver optional operation,which means you don't need anybody on the tractor and also we act as a datahub. So that's where the connectivty portion kicks in we're trying to takethe whole agg equipment space from being just a mechanical devise thesedays, which is where things are and speeding past the elecrification side,speeding, past the automation side directly to Ar Electric Smart,automated data hurbor or too. So that's the transformation that we're trying todo without tractor tessle for tractors. You must hear that a lot. Is itsomething that drives you crazy, something that you accept or somethingthat you're secretly flattered by well. I have two reactions to that. Oneis if they're talking about, as just as how testler transformed the automotiveindustry pc ourselves as an agent of change, so that's very complimentarybut Ryan. To be honest, it also grossly under epresence. What we're trying todo. We are not just about etrification we're about changing farm economics,making the foodeqo system more sustainable around the world and rightfrom Davon, our tractor was meant to be a product for a global farmer right,not just the elite. So with that in mind, the it's not a fullrepresentation of what our producters, nor what our companies about. But atthe same time you know we are happy when people talk about us being thetesl of tractors as an agent of change for an industry that has not beentransformed for a very long time yeah. I love it and we love to bring guestson right as they're breaking some big news. I know this week was a big weekfor you guys. What can you tell us? Yeah this week was huge. It's now outin the press. The Wal Street Journal...

...has an article on US case, new Holland,industrial, which is a large conglomerate that includes tractor cartractor brands like new Holland and case, but also other industrial brands,including everco trucks, has announced their investment in our company, whichis tremendous, because it's not oftem that you see the incumbents investinginto a startup. You don't see too many examples where existing industry,that's about to be transformed, is actually accepting of change, but thatannouncement is out there now, which is ou, know something that we're veryproud of, because those guys came the tested our product. I you spent a lotof time with them and for them to say that we want to be partners on thisjourney with. You is a huge validation of our efforts. At the end of the day,farmers don't want some new fangle technology that doesn't work for themor Newfangal technology that scares them. So the fact that we have unknownagriculture equipment brand, one that has a global footprint, one thatbelieves in farmer sustainability and currently builds tractors in hugevolumes and deploys them also lends a lot of credibility to to our customerswho care about it. So from that standpoint, we're very excited aboutthat news and it's not just a product collaboration rind. We're also excitedabout the fact that our technology is going to be applid across all of theirsegments, which is everything from otroad equipment to agriculture, totheir bus division. ETCA. So very excited about that part. I love itcongrats, so forvine you and I have known each other for ten or fifteenyears now I met you when you were running Motivo, a company that washelping my the company. I was running, execute on some work that we had gottenourselves into, but could not execute on so known you for a long time. I'vebeen a big fan for a long time. Matima was an engineer. It was an innovationengineering shop. Talk to me about your journey from there to hear. You knownow you're running this, this atonomas tractor company, like I remember youguys, being very focused on on road vehicles. At that time, you talkedabout that journey, a little bit, yeah wow, that's a blast from the past Ryan,like when we started working together right. That was definitely back in theearly days of Mativa, where we were working on a lectrification. Aroundthat same time, we had actually invested into a into a connectivityplatform that was specializing in Ota over the air updates and very much atthe automation. A revolution had not just started yet they were no autonomy,car companies when Youand ierking together at that time, but on theMotera side we saw the convergence on the product side. That's the e wholereason why I started motiwo. You know ten clas years ago was products weregetting more complex. It was not just mechanical products or electricalproducts or just digital products. You needed all those three skill sets to develop the current projects, andthat's not something that most people are good at is having all those threedisciplines work together to develop,...

...compelling useur experiences to develop fantasticproducts, so that was the whole Genesis of Motia, where we worked on electricboard, celectric cars, electric planes and everything from one wheel way collsto to electric airplanes like I just talked about, but along that journey wealso were a part of the autonomy revolution that came up which all of usare now familiar with, which is autonomous cars autonomous bikes, youname it. Everything is now atonomous, seeing all of those industries gettransformed and living in California, where we are surrounded by agriculture,surrounded by nuts farm, surrounded by some Woll, famous VINIARD, etc. A lotof the farmer started approaching as saying hey, you know you guys areworking on all this great technology. Can you do something for us on thefarming side and that's sor of I got introduced to agtech Ou, know Fiv, plusyears ago, when I went out to the field, I saw something that looked veryfamiliar and that's something that Ryan you and I and Luke have seen on theautomotive side. No innovation, a lot of stagnation on the technology side,everything was a commodity. Connectivity was not being takenadvantage of. The digital transformation had just not happened,yet it's the same things that the three of us have heard before to right. Ohthese, a commolity products right, everybody cares about dollars and sentsand nobody will will pay for a connected car or an automated car or asmart car. You know we'll just take a screen in there or stick as manyscreens as possible and that's what connective videos all about. Havingseen that happen in automotive and seen the change that happened thanks toConnectivit, plus automation, transforming thet product. I wanted todo the same thing in agriculture and when I looked around, people were notdoing it and I saw a huge opportunity and having a global mindset. I wantedto do a product that really could could be sold anywhere in the world. Sothat's why we focused on the Compact tractor and started monar tractor acouple of years ago to bring that to life as a completely separate companypurely focused on food sustainability and the digital transformation ofagriculture. I love it. You touched on this a little bit, but are there somespecific challenges to operating in agricultural environment? That mightsurprise people? You know, maybe they even surprised you you were like. Ihadn't even considered this yeah agriculture is it's something that allof us feel is very low tech right when, when we kind of drive by on thesehighways- and we kind of pick oer into the farms, O kind of Cagus very much-you know you think of this big colbind harvesters, and you see this bigmechanical equipment. It's not something that a lot of us think aboutis techology focused. We also don't realize how reactionary agriculture isso to touch upon the challenges. Ryan, one of the big challenges in Agg is,you know you do not control a number of the elements, so, unlike manufacturing,where you control ninety five plus...

...percent and things might be late orthere's quality control issues, the biggest thing in ag is: is the weatherwe don't control the weather, so the seasonality changes. Whether changesmeans that in some of our crops, that monortractor operates and if there's asudden drop in humidity in the middle of the night, the farmers have to getup at two am in the morning and do an operation, so the reaction Tines haveto be very very fast, so that's one, which is very surprising. It's alsosurprising on like how much affoort goes into agriculture, how manystakeholders they are in agriculture. We often talk about it in connectivity.Right is, if you look at the automotive world, for example, Oh there'sregulations, e dealerships, thers, the consumer, there's HA car companies, butif you look at it an egg there's even more stake holders. There's a federalgovernment which plays a huge role in agriculture. There's the stategovernments, the Playe Roll, the commodity markets in some places arecontrolled, there's some prize sets, etc. The weather is there right andthen there's a lot of those stakeholders so which means when you're,when you're trying to get a product out when you think about like productfeatures and the channel to market the product in or how do you distribute itor you support it and all of that? It's a very complex ecosystem. So I justtalked about two different things: one is the reactionary element. The secondone is the number of stake holders, but the third one is how robust stoff needsto be. You know we are all used to. We talk about it, and cars are like. Ohten years right, I lik use PEK cars or, like ten plus years, etceter an egg.It's common to see tractors that are thirty, pluse years old. So, whenyou're developing a connected smart product, how do you develop a productthat farmers want to keep for ten plus years, that's being passed on fromgeneration to generation and comes with the farm? Usually, if you buy a farm,you get the tractor along with it. So these are the kind of things that makethe whole landscare very challenging and also very interesting. It's it's afantastic place for all of us who have been in other market segments likeaerospace and automotive and mobility to apply all those lessons into farming.So for people out there taskd with developing an Iot product, we got a lotof people out there. You know in the business of connected devices, probably the the only familiarity thatthey might have with ag and antractors is the story of right to repair. Whatcan you tell us about that as it pertains to developing a connecteddevice? You know what challenges has that presented that might be relevantto somebody else. That's entering an regulatory environment, and that'sreally pointed at the internal combustion world. Here you are comingin on the on the autonomous electric side. How has that affected you guys sojust to frame the landscape? There? Farmers historically are very usedworking on their equipment. They all...

...have equipment, sheds, welders andtheir very hands on. So it's not like a typical consumer who does not have alift to even lift a car up and work on it right, so farmers have are used tothat kind of an ecosystem. They'd also don't have lot of margins, and then thebusiness forming is a very aggressive financial world. So they're alwayslooking for cost savings. What's happened over the last decade is asequipment has gotten smarter, like the big combines are now have gpspositioning systems on them. theyare emissions control systems on them theycripen manufacturers, with the dealerships being some of their stakeholders, have started to look at it as a revenue channel. So from a productstrategy, standporand sertainly. You now have a product where and acorporate strategy, where you're trying to use the maintenance and service ASERas a revenue stream and also the techology itself, is so complex thatthey could not due to leg regulations, could not let it be controlled by theconsumer. They had to provide some compliance back to the regulator agency.So, for example, if it's emissions equipment and your tamper with itthat's an issue. So with those kind of constraints the equipment manufacturersbasically started, saying that we need to, you, know, have diagnostics, andthis equipment cannot be touched or repaired or modified farmers. Obviouslythat's not in their farmer's best interest. So if, in the middle ofHarwest, you only have a limited time whether is going to change on you again,equipment is down, and you say, Hey for first to repair this thing: You youbetter wait until our master technician comes there with this diagnostic toplugs it in tells you what's wrong and then weall take it back. That's notfeasible. We have heard stories last year about how some over the airupdates actually disable certain machines and the last two weeks duringharvest which immediately shows up on your production yield. So so that's why there's a very strongreaction is due to the expectations of the cost. The farmers were not aligned.The way it was deployed is not insinct with their interests and the issuesthat they're running into ore, making such matters worse in a timeconstrained environment right. So that's the Chartenge. So our wholephilosophy is the opposite right and it's something that I think companiesare now Starteng to think about. Is: Let's use technology not to createbarriers, let's use techology, to create a bridge. What I mean by that isa farmers want to repair, and if you have connectivity over the airtechnology available, what if we use that tech to ensure that the farmer isfixing things the right way? What if we can kind of provide some connectivityand some calibration and some compliance reporting build ing to theproduct so that we know that hey this thing is tillincompliance. Everythingis fine. Yeyas the farmer modified. It so what if we can use over the air fortraining, what if we can use over the air to support it instead of waitingfor some person to show up in a remote area? So that's our philosophy is wewant farmers to feel like our tractor...

...is their attractor and once theypurchase it, it really is their tractor and we use technology to enable them tofeel more connected. Excuse the PUN to the tractor. Well, I want to thank youfirst of all for the repeated plug of over the air and Eyou AV Fiveolla forevery time says over the ARA because use that in marketing, but so is partof the answer. Now. Let Me Return. The plug back to monarch is part of thevalue probe that there is nothing to repair in the first place. You know byremoving the internal conbustion engine. You know you guys are delivering. Youknow you hear this about. TESSLA, hey gone, are the spark blugs gone. Are Theoil changes? You know you're going to change the the tires every couple years,but is that a big part of the value prop for you guys as well? That, likeyou know yes, this value this right to repair as authority issue? Monarch istrying to be on the right side of things, but also there's just a lotless to repair exactly. There is right and that's where the combination ofelectrification, plus the automation plus the dataside of it all kicks inand when you combine all of that, that really gives our farmers and who are acustomers, a huge advantage, US maintenance cost. We know from theelectric bus industry, for example, are usually down anywhere from sixty toeighty percent compared to a normal desel engine bus. So our farmers willgain that same advantage, so that helps from that standpoint. But I and thewhole team at MONARC is not the kind of ar not the kind of people. whod behappy with just those kind of operational savings. Our whole ambitionis: How can we use the data and the connectivity side to really enable thefarmor to tell their story to the enconsumer? What if data is not just anoperational savings too? It's about telling your story and your story isyour brand and if he can create a brand for the farmer Ryan. Now we increaseingthe value of the CRAFP. It's not just about diesel savings, maintenance,savings or efficiency. It's about storytelling, it's about talking aboutwhat makes your crop unique or your environment unique or the way you farm,unique and getting that across. So the technology side for us is, is a part of the whole product solutionand is a part OC part of our philosophy as well. Staying on like some of thethings that that are unique about monarch, you know you and I talked about when you know looking at the connecteddevicis space. What are some things that you think people outside of yourindustry, just across connected devices world should start doing, and- and youmentioned you know this modular approach to product development. Canyou talk about that and and like what you mean by that and h like how thathas played out? You know at monarch, and then also? I should quicklyintroduce my cohost, who I've not ever...

...called out, but Mister Luke Wilhelm, onthe call of us today joining us as a former appler who are steadfastbelievers in nonmodular approach to product development, so by a thousanddollar phone, keep it for three years, throw it in the garbage by a new one.So I'm interested to hear monarchs approach on this versus you know whatyou've seen in the marketplace and I'll let luke give voice to alternativeapproaches yeah. So you touched upon a pet peeve of Mine Ryan. So I'm going toget emotional here and go on a Bigg rant and we might pitct fork along herewhich I'm allowed to do being in the AGG pace. I have very good access topitchforks right right, so I do not understand why, in this dayand age, our products are so tightly integrated right that we are limited by what that productcomes out of the box with and for us to really jump to. The nextgeneration very often means discarding the old one, and that's true for, likeeverything from the speakers in my house to the you, NOI'm Goinna play aplayup to the Silicon Valley, stereotype here to the room byin myhouse, to like all of these things ar all of these things are come out ofthis box and I'm limited by what I open the box up. Why is it that I can getanother censer Upgrad for the room, but why is it that my spots preker? Youknow I still stuck on an old blue to channel. I love it, but I really wantto move on and how is thit? Okay for the companythat I like so much that has sold me that product to say h, you know for youto like really buy. You know you should really buy our next product AU knowthat one that you love, that we created a connection to you with hes throw IDin the trash. Is that good for your brand, which brand person thinks thathat that bails? That is helpful right, so long story short, I'm a bigproponent of modularity on the monartractor side, especially withfarmers I talked about this before who are who like to keep the equipment fora long time. I really we kno right from day when wewere like hey our sensor. Sweet is going to get obsoleted pretty quickly, so, but farmers want to keep thetractors for ten plass years, so we made the old censor, sweet modular. Wemade our battery modular. We made some of the Fuser Touchin heur faces verymodular, so all of these means that the cort Chasse and the core expensive bitstays the same, but our farmers can continue to upgrade, but it's still thetractor that they can name and can stay in their family for generations, butstill have access to the latest and greatest. So my question to lookprobably who I should put on thes spot is yes, I know why are we not seeing moreof this, and or is it something that's happening in a secret apple lab, butsomewhere? Look that nobody knows about in a classic apple fashion, yeah. We could talk about that, butsomebody would somebody would zip line through my skylife. If I did soprobably shouldn't talk about the secret labs, I think therare pros anconstant to both approaches to prock...

...design, PROC development and productlifecycles. I think the advantage to an integrated product is that you drivedown the size, the cost, the weight and the overhead that comes with makingthings able to be put together and taken apart. It would be very hard, forexample, to create an iphone where you could unscrew the camera successfully,disconnected from all the things that it's attached to put anew one on andstill have this be camera. You can drop in your pool and not break so like whenyou, when you want to get a seamless integration of functions in thetightest most reliable, lifeweight package possible, then integrating thatas far down the changes you can is what you want to do, and I think that thatextends into automotive to a certain degree, Wereto Ang to a certain degreeas well. If you want to make it so that you're, for example, taking yourTestland, they tried to do this swamping battery packs in and outinstead of charging them, because you don't Wanto have to pay to put in thecharging infrastructure. You can do that. But now you have to makeeverything about that battery be okay to have outside of the e vehicle, butthen plug it in and take it out and plug it in an takeit that Pluga thentake it out and all the connectors all your high power connections. All ofyour fasteners, all those things have to be able to do that, and so it drivescomplexity, cost weight and volume up, and so I think, there's a smart way todo it and I think, by doing it the very beginning of pract design like you'redoing, and if you define the interfaces of the subcomponents as well aspossible as early as possible. Then you make that potentially over the life ofa card, because it's not you can't swap a battery out of a test Lub five yearsfrom now, but you're not doing it every single time. So I think, if you'resmart, about how you set that up up front and it's not a thing you're goingto do on a regular basis, but it's a once in a while thing and it's not socomplicated that you're likely to break the other functions of the product andwith apple with the Mac, with the macbook with the phone with an air pod.All those things are so small and light, and there's so much functionality.That's jammed Indo it that the to expect somebody, that's not a tranedexpert and even be ov. The trained experts to be able to take it apart,fix, apthing and put it back together. So that makes sense look, and I wasbeing provocative when I called out the airpor products, but I think my wholeissue is: I would expect to see more modular devises in our life on a dailybasis and it's amazing actually how few of these devices are modular. You knowhow can we get get more modularity into thes smart devises, especially the moreexpensive ones, especially the more you know. Things like like I said you knowwhether it's e the smart fridges or th, the spart vacuum cleaners, or you knowin the spart world, where everything is connected. Having some modurarity isalmost expected, but somehow it's going the other way. It's an interestingthing to think about. You know just the idea that you've got a suite of Sonospeakers being able to keep some of the...

...outside and replace some of the inside,particularly the batteries that that seems to be the real problem area thatthe batteries are just like. unworkably nonmodular t they were never designedto be swapped, and so the entire thing becomes landfill because of that issue,Yoa so porviing as we're wrapping up getting getting to close here. Just acouple of other questions for you. One thing I wanted to ask you, you know seeyour ceoof, a company Ou guys make up hardware device, got folks out therelistening that are tasked with developing a connected device, ahardware product wit's, something that you hear a lot. But you totallydisagree with. You know you wil. This is something that you it's conventionalwisdom and you couldn't disagree more strongly. Yeah. I think a common one that I hear all the timeand I have a contraryin view and I'm happy to be on the minority on that one,because it gives us a big different sharer is when you do a connecteddevice figuring out. The data monetization somehow is seen as a passor a crutch for value proposition for the hardware product. So what I mean bythat is everything cannot be spept, Unde Rug of like somehow well monetizetha data at some point. Hence right. Let's do this. I understand theaspirational nature of of that statement. I understand that what thedata use might be is not well understood in the current time whencompared to the future, but still I I think it's something that's bandiedabout way too often and is often reads to trust issues between whoever theconsumer is or whoare with the you know. In our case, the farmer is, and themanufacturers, so we can art from a product development standpoint justcollect data Willy Nelli, under the guys that a will figure, thevalue of it out later on the other side of it is also when you're thinkingabout the whole product value proposition. We just can't say well,let's deploy a thousand dollar machine and sell it for fifty bucks and hopethat the other nine fifty somehow shows up on the on the dat of monitization side rightso that that basically is abdigating a responsibility from a product strategystandpoint. I'm a big believer that the hardware has to be well taught throughfrom a user experience standpoint and from a value proposition standpoint,and the data is the icing on the cake. One of our farmers actually told us.This is like guys like. I love the automation. I love the data, but don'tforget your tractor is the cake. Everything else is icing on the cake,if you invort that that's not a great cake, so it's something that weactually joke about a lot right is this: you are to get the proportion right andfor us, the hardter hardware side of it and how well that works is the cake andthe rest of it is important. Weawe, try really hard to make sure that we getthat prioritization right as well for the sake of our customers. Let's justpull it. That thread a little bit. I...

...think most people that have been in thespace al Say I totally agree. You know likemonetizing data is not a strategy, it's it. I don't know it cannot be the cake,but I agree with its places as the icing so but like talking about thecake, the purchasers ar products are often like fiercely loyal to brandsthat have solved hard problems. What's a what's a problem like headline, ormaybe it's like buried down in the MINUSIA. Most people wouldn't evenappreciate its difficulty, but can you give us an example, as you've developedthis product of a problem that was like fantastically thorny? You know- maybeit wasn't even something you were anticipating that you guys have had tosolve for along the way. I think the big one for ust from that standpoint ishow do we make a very ropast product while keeping it? You know modular andlooked at a great job of explaining the pros and cons of it, but that was ahuge challenge for us and those compromises had to be made on our sidewithout compromising the product. So II'll give you an exact example. Is Wetook on the challenge that nobody else has even an automotive nobody else aswhich is in order to make our censor sweet system completely mordular, wehad to put everything into the roof and really package the roof up, and sinceit's agriculture, it gets prayed not just with water, but also with strongchemicals like Salpur, and things like that. So we had to package this wholething up, make sure that it passes all the all the ropostinous requirementsand the environment requirements, but also do it at a cost arget that wasvealy challenging. So what we had to do to do our sensor, swit was while wewere using a lot of production scale, sensors. We had to do some customdevelopment as well, and some innovation with respect to how wecooled all of these electronics and the computeer that was in the roof. Sothere was a mixing and matching of off the shelf weresus custom plusinnovation to meet the modelited requirements, the environmentalrequirements and the CAS targets. So the roof is something that we're veryproud of in terms of what you're managed to achieve an none of theautonomous cars that you see have kind of really pushed it into into that areawith that modelarity right for very good reasons. So that was a crazychallenge and you would appreciate this Rhyn and I avoided using the World Ota.Since you last mentioned it iis the connectiityside, the antenes. We still have to deal with the anternosright. We still have to deal with the GPS system, that's inside our roof andthe communication that has to happen there. So when you do this very strongintegrations, especially with communications on board, there's allkinds of noise challenges that you run into as well, so environmental plusnoise, when I said noise I'me, not talking about physical audible, noise,a'd talking about the electromagnetic noise and Antina communication issues,so all of that combined made it a really chachallenging project,something we're very proud of, and we...

...have like three or four of those kindof things on our tractor that make it incredible. When you look at thelandscape, so you know you're solidly both feet in the connected device world.You guys are building something that you know no one's ever done before.It's incredibly cool there' seems to be plenty to be terrified about in notwith regards to your product, but just the evolution of the the speed and thedirection that technology is going. A lot to be excited about, most justseems uncertain. You know people are unclear. What's your thought on andlike what would you share with listeners out there, the worldaccording to previne? Where is the world going? You know, as it pertainsto connected devices like what are some themes that you see when we'rerevisiting this episode on the best of you know in five years we're lookingback what are some things that you think would be true, then, for tenyears from now that maybe aren't now, but we're headed there. L. I think whatfills me with a lot of excitement and hope for the future is the way we lookat the devices in the world that we live in. This is very much from theconnected device pace like the early days of the Internet. Right everybody'sgot a connected device is like everybody's, putting up a website, butthe opportunitieis of what that means when it comes to our daily lives of nowthat you can do banking here, you have like your whole. Life is now touched by.You know, Bu by the Web, right your shopping experience. Everything hasbeen touched. Similarly, thanks to connecte devises, which werer veryearly days on, I think every aspect of our life will be touched in Ou,meaningful manner. What I mean by that and I'll givean example from themonartractor standpoint is all of us have discovered our strong definity andar strong connection to the FODICO system, thanks to Covit, we've allbecome cooks or try to cook or, if nothing else, you're watching morecooking documentaries on net flike yeah sow I'm looking at your rind, so but thanks fo connected devices likethe monar tractor right, thats Stougf, that's in your friedge ar the stuffthat you're about to eat. You now have a more meaningful relationship, becauseyou know how it was formed. You know who the farmer was. You know what wentinto it. It's like how much you enjoy a glass of wine and the story that goesbehind it. Imagine that for every omponent of your meal right, imaginethat from the salad to the the meat to you name it right. If you felt thatkind of an experience on your food side and that whole thing was digital right,you don't have somebody telling you how you know what what is in that wind it. It istold to you in a digital fashion, right a digital storytelling. So I thinkthat's how it's going to be very meaningful and I think, connecteddevises right now being used for things like formwar updates and maintenance,and all of that which, which is good, don't get me wrong, but I don't thinkthey have a meaningful effect on our day to day lives. And that's whatexcites me it's five years from now.

You know I expect to have mind, blowingexperiences for every small thing and our expectation is going to be so muchhigher for every part of our life. So that's what I think all of us have tolook forward to with hope. That's a lot to be excited about prevaine. I really appreciate you beinghere with us today. We wish you guys the best. O Luck!Congratulations on closing your most recent round, and we wish you guys allthe luck, Ryan, thanks lout for having me and great te yeah get to be on thisjourney. ND THANKS FOR OU support. Thanks Lok be an save thing.Ongratulations, you shouldn't have to worry about IOTprojects dragging on or unreliable vendors. You've got enough on yourplate. The right team of Engineers and project managers can change a pilotalmoment for your business into your competitive edge. Various close knitcrew of ambitious problem, solvers, continuous improvers and curiousbuilders know how to turn your ideas into a reality on time and up to yourstandards, with a focus on metigating risk and maximizing opportunity willhelp you build an Iot solution that you can hang your hat on. Let's bring yourIot idea to life, learn more at very possiblecom. You've been listening to over the AirIot connected devices and the journey, if you enjoy today's episode, make sureto hit subscribe in your favorite podcast player and give us a rating.Have a question or an idea for a future episode. Send it to podcast at verypossiblecom. SEE YOU NEXT TIME.

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