The Recipe For Creating a Culinary Connected Device

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It’s hard enough to marry the worlds of hardware and software when creating a connected device.

Imagine throwing another specialized discipline with its own language and rigid ways of working into the development process too.

That’s exactly what David Rabie, Founder & CEO at Tovala, dealt with in creating a company that pairs a smart oven with a meal delivery service.

In this episode, he describes how they established a culture of collaboration that brought all three disciplines together under a unified mission.

Topics covered:

  • Bridging the worlds of culinary and tech
  • The strategy behind using Kickstarter
  • How a marketing pivot drove new growth
  • How finding product-market fit led to operational challenges

Our exclusive discount code for Tovala to purchase the oven for $89 and includes six orders is: verypossible

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We're going after a different problem andand kind of a different core customer than those meal kids. And what makesus unique kind of the ability to access that customer segment and solve that problemis the oven and the connected nature of our whole business. You are listeningto over the Air Iot connected devices and the journey, brought to you byvary. In each episode we have sharp, unfiltered conversations with executives about their IOTjourneys, the mistakes they made, the lessons they learned and what theywish they'd known when they started. All right, hey everyone, welcome backto over the air, IOT connected devices and the journey. My name isRyan Processer, and today we're joined by David Rabbi, founder and CEO ofto Valla. We're going to be talking about the recipe for creating a successfulconnected device that lives at the intersection of food and technology. David, thanksfor being on the show. Yeah, my pleasure. I'm excited to behere. So, David, you know pun alert. Obviously, I droppedrecipe on purpose. You guys are doing some really cool things with food andFood Tech. For those that don't know, can you tell us a little bitabout to Valla and the mission of making it easier for people to eatbetter. Yeah, so to Valla is a connected smart oven paired with achef prepared meal service. And so the ideas we send you meals that arepreprepped mostly wrong ingredients. You spend about a minute preparing your dish, scana barcode and the oven downloads the proper cook cycle from the cloud and cooksyour meal automatically and twenty minutes or less. So you get kind of the bestparts of home cooking without any of the pain associated with chopping, cutting, marinating, cooking or, of course, cleaning. So that's that's the visionat a high level. So there's some others in what would seem tobe the same space, I don't know, like blue apron comes to mind,but you're not really in that space at all. You guys are targetedat busy professionals and and you've you know...

...well, you're here on the showtoday talking about hardware. Talk to us about what you guys are doing that'sa little bit different and the product that comes along with the food. Yeah, so when you when we think about meal kit companies like Blue Apron orhell of fresh or home chef there in the business of helping people learn howto cook and also eliminating the planning and shopping that goes into the weekly mealcooking process. We are we are going after a very different customer and solvinga very different problem. We're really focused on people that want a high qualitymeal on an average Tuesday or Wednesday night and don't have time to do itand and a lot of our customers tend to replace food delivery with Tavalla.So it's folks that are ordering from the door dashes of the world two,three four times a week. And a lot of our customers are people thattry blue apron but ultimately churned because it wasn't actually solving their problem. Andso we're going after a different problem and and kind of a diff front corecustomer than those meal kids. And what makes us unique kind of the abilityto access that customer segment and solve that problem is the oven and the connectednature of our whole business. Can you, I mean we're going to get intoproduct market fit in a minute, but can you talk a little bitabout what you thought was, or you guys felt was that unmet customer needor what your thesis was going in that you thought those companies weren't addressing.Yeah, the core thesis was that on one side you had a bunch ofcompanies that were sending people ingredients, helping them learn how to cook, butcustomers are still doing the cooking. On the other end, you had alot of companies sending people food that was fully cooked and asking them just toreheat it in the oven or the microwave. And we felt like the intersection ofthose two was actually the biggest opportunity because you get to capitalize on people'sdesire for the best parts of home cooking, the wrong ingredients, the smell thehome, the taste of the food, texture of the food, but theconvenience of the other end, where it's just scan a bar code andValla your meal is done. So it was kind of the intersection of highquality and high convenience where we felt like there was nothing on the market reallyaddressing that well, so bridging high quality...

...and and convenience. So like,on the one side, you guys are trying to really nail the service you'reproviding, so you've got this this hardware, you've got the service behind it,which is software. If then, on the other side there's food.You know, you guys are responsible for pulling that together. That, atleast from our point of view, very unusual. Can you talk about bridging, I guess, what I will call culinary and tech, you know,and really needing to be masters of three things, hardware, software and andthe you know, the food piece of that. What does that look like? Let's start with that. Yeah, it's a great question. That's atthe core of what makes our business different. It's what makes the business really hard. It's very hard to operate a business like that. It was veryhard to get it off the ground. But it's also what lets us deliveron that value proposition we were talking about. If, if we only did oneof those three things, or even two of those three things, wewouldn't be able to send you wrong ingredients that require a minute of preparation andand no cooking. The reason we can do that is we've got chefs inin our D kitchen, we've got chefs in a production facility, we've gotsoftware that kind of sits in between everything and we've got an oven that we'vebuilt that does the cooking. And so it's this full system very similar toespresso. Or curegg or Peloton as companies that we often look to as comps. That allows us to deliver on kind of this product promise. You know, what makes it hard is you you need multiple different disciplines working together ona unified mission, but with very different work styles, work languages, backgroundsexperiences. That makes things really challenging, I'd say, and and we're farfrom amazing at it. But but I think we have gotten some things rightthat have allowed us to get to this point. I have to believe thatone of the unique challenges of your company is is that you know that differencein skill sets. You know. So you've got people with culinary backgrounds atvery you know the company that I run,...

...you know we really have a bigfocus on hardware, a big focus on software, to say nothing oflike having a big focus on food. And how do you bring all ofthose I mean we struggle just with having hardware and software people be able tobe under one roof, for example, like agile engineering. You know,engineers just go nuts when you try to wedge that into their worldview. Thatsays nothing about like introducing a giant group of chefs with their opinions and theirworkflows. What does that look like for you guys, I mean just culturally. How do you make that work? Yeah, it's a great question and, like I said, I don't think we're the experts by any means.There's, you know, continued challenges on that front. I think a fewthings that we have done really well are build a strong company culture and onethat is very team focused, and so you combine that with a group ofpeople that have a high learning mentality and really believe in the growth mindset.We have a lot of people that want to learn, they want to learnother disciplines and they want to do what's best for the team. So that'sa really good recipe, I would say, for minimizing conflict and friction. Whenfolks are trying to work together but have their very different styles, theyoften share the same goal. So I think that's that's one piece. We'vebeen fortunate to have several people in the company that have become glue factors andand bridges, as I like to say, that are great at speaking multiple languagesand understand all the various parts of the business, so they can workreally well to bridge gaps between different functions. And we've got folks like this throughoutthe organization and having those has been game changing for us because they theyare the ones that really helped get things done between functions. So I'd saythose are those are two of the things. But but again it continues to bechallenging and as we had more people, you know, it's a new challengefor everyone that joins. Yeah, I know that you mentioned you workedreally closely with your CTEO on the technology...

...development. He was really instrumental indriving a lot of these things forward. Do you, when you think aboutthe technology side of the business like from a chicken egg perspective? Did youfirst view this as our I guess, did you first and foremost view thisas a software problem or a hardware problem on the technology side of your approach? I mean, we hired our first software engineer and first hardware engineer withina month of each other, so hard to say which one was a biggerobstacle. I think probably hardware at the time just felt a little more frontand center and higher risk and bigger challenge in some ways. But frankly,there's never you know, if you think about the three stools, the software, hard where and food, we really haven't ever been at a point whereit's like, well, one is ten times more important than than the othertwo. I think right. Really won't makes the business go is that allthree of those are really important and you know, for some parts of theorganization some are more important than others. For our customers some are more importantthan others. But, net net, what makes the business really special isthat all three of those have to be really important and we have to bereally good at all of them. Did it. Can you talk about theso like focusing for a minute on the hardware and then let's move to productmarket fit? I'm always super interested in how people what that journey look like. But but just staying on the product for a minute, you guys havethis oven that you know helps people prepare the food, it scans the barcode, it's like very integrated with the software. To call it just anoven I think underserves what you guys have developed. But for people out therelistening that are building a hardware product, they either know or they will soonlearn, hardware is very hard. Can you talk about in you guys ashardware journey, how off the shelf is what you've built versus like a totalground up rethink on like what am I thinking of? COUNTERTOP oven is,I don't think the right category to call it. But yeah, can youtalk about the extent to which that's a rethink or off the shelf or ablend? Yeah, I'd say it's a...

...blend. It's definitely not an entirelynew oven concept and that was very deliberate. You know, we felt like ovenswere great tool to begin with and definitely did not need reinvention. Thatwas our thesis. There are other companies that had different thecs on the samedevice and especially as we thought about what was the primary use case for ourcustomers, and you know the core use cases. You order our meals,you scan of our code and it cooks automatically, and we didn't need torecreate the oven to deliver on that. So we worked with companies that werealready making countertop ovens. Some of the critical changes that we had to make, though. Our ovens are steam ovens first off, so that allows thethe food to be a lot juicier when you cook it. So they allhave you know that we've got two generations of ovens. Each of them haddifferent mechanisms for storing and boiling water and generating steam within the chamber, butit gives the chef's another lever of a different way to heat up the food, and sometimes the steam is combined with dry heat, which is a verypowerful way to cook. That's pretty uncommon in the home. It's quite commonin the commercial space, but you don't see a ton of steam ovens infolks homes. So that was kind of one piece. And then the secondpieces is the connected side. So the oven is WIFI enabled and and thatallows us to do a whole host of things, including updating our recipes everysingle week depending on what's landing in your homes, adding recipes for you tomake yourself to the APP, adding grocery items that can cook just by scanninga UPC code. So those are all things that are enabled by the Wifi connection and that was a major change that we had to make to thethe ovens that we were working with. And then, you know, designelements, branding elements, some UX things that we did ourselves as well.So shifting a little bit now to product market fit you talked about. Youknow, this is an unusual in the home way to cook. Allows thechefs some flexibility provides an outcome that people love as far as the quality ofthe food. One of the questions I ask everybody on the show is howdid you know you were building the right...

...thing? Hardware is so scary,you know, because you may you make it first and you find out laterif anybody actually wants the thing. And I think that you guys are thefirst to have come out of kickstarter that we've ever had on the show.So you got started on kickstarter, got some great traction and never looked back. Can you talk about you know, yeah, can you talk a littlebit about that journey? Sure, yeah, it's a great question. First off, really humbled that were the first kickstarter company to be on the PODCAST. A little surprised, but that's awesome to hear. Yeah, so wedid kickstarter about a year before we actually were in homes and the gold arewas first, prove out some demand for the product and, second, geta base of early adopters that we could kind of test things on. Upuntil that point we had done a lot of Beta testings just putting the hardwareand homes making the food ourselves. The hardware was pretty different. It wassomething we bought off Amazon and modified and and that gave us some early evidencethat people liked what we were doing, but but very nascent and informal.The kickstarter was another positive up. We sold about a thousand units on kickstarter. But our business is not selling ovens, our business is selling food and thatwas a very hard thing to get hard date on until we were actuallyin market. So kickstarter was another hey, we reason to believe that we shouldkeep up with this thing. We launched a year later and and itwas a bit of Hay. All right, this is it, we're putting itin market. Let's cross our fingers and hope we weren't totally off baseand we've got enough here that will learn our way into finding product market fit. And you know, the early data was really positive from customers. Peoplelove the food and that that was a huge question mark for us of like, all right, our people actually going to like the food? Are theygoing to keep ordering it? What is our retention going to look like?And in those early months, even though our many only had five items everyweek and the ovens were fairly early stage, customers love the products and they stuckaround in a pretty big way,...

...especially as we were comparing to reallyanyone else doing meal, meal kits or prepared food. The challenge was thatwe could not know, we could not figure out how to acquire new customers. So existing customers love the product and our retention was really strong and becauseit's a product that people are ordering every week, we had pretty nice revenuefigures for a new company, but we were really struggling to translate that intonew customer growth and that was about a two year journey, I'd say,from we launched in the summer of two thousand and seventeen and it wasn't untillate summer of two thousand and nineteen that we really unlocked it and found productmarket fit. I remember you saying previously that that retention allowed you to kindof one of the things we hear a lot from from entrepreneurs is like convenientfacts allow you to rationalize things away, and you guys had this great retentionearly on and you said, you know, the world is fantastic, but youwere struggling to drive new growth and that was a hard reality. Itdiscovered that it wasn't a product problem, I believe is the discussion from previousand that there was a lot of but that, like elevating marketing really unlockedthings for you. Can you talk a little bit about that journey and whatit looked like to I don't know if that was customer education or awareness,or maybe you can tell us a little bit about that. Yeah, sothe way we got there is we kind of went back to basics. Weinterviewed some of our best customers. These are folks that were had been withus for a year and a half, love the product, high engagement andwe wanted to hear from them. How do they describe to Balla had?What do they tell their friends about to Vallah? Why do they love toVallah? And we did ten or fifteen of these interviews and really started topull out some common threads between all of those. So that was kind ofpart one. Part Two we went and interview people that had spent a lotof time on our website and not actually...

...purchased and we got them on that. We paid them, got them on the phone and just ask them why, what are the reasons you didn't get over the Hump, because clearly somethingresonated with you that you were going to spend three, four five minutes onour website. And from there we got another list. We took those twothings, rebuilt the brand, rebuilt our website and redid our pricing strategy,and those were the three major levers that we used to drive up our conversionrate, which was the real metric we were tracking. We you know,at the time we were acquiring a certain percentage of customers that landed on ourwebsite. We needed to get that percentage up by about twenty thirty percent andif we could, the economics would start to really make sense around Lt meto Cak and starting to scale spend on our website and really start to drivegrowth. And you know, the new website brought a lot more trust forconsumers. It helped educate around what we were doing and answered some very fundamentalquestions for customers about what this product is, how it works, what it isn't. And then the pricing strategy really reduced the barrier for folks to getin and try the product and and those things were massive, massive levers forus and it was almost like overnight things started to click and we had moredemand than we could actually fulfill. Interesting so it sounds like there was anumber of small iterations, but a few Eureka breakthroughs and pricing was one ofthem. Yes, and then, not to discredit or diminish you know,these this these hard earned lessons that you guys use to drive growth. ButI'm guessing covid was probably pretty good to your business. Is that fair tosay that, during a time when people are in their home, a companylike yours has become I'm guessing you guys had a pretty good two thousand andtwenty. Yeah, Covid was was certainly very good for us. I thinkwe're really, really fortunate that we found product market fit seven months before covid. Sure, because, yeah, it gave us a lot of credibility withinvestors when we went to raise money during covid that hey, once, oncethis thing starts to pass and normalize a...

...little bit, our business is notgoing to fall apart, because we grew. We grew about three and a halffour x before Covid, you know, from that point when we found productmarket fit. But then Covid was definitely a boon. You know,is a huge driver of demand for us. Usage went up. Really every metricwent up into the right and did for a long period of time.Operationally. It was hugely challenging because I bet we we produce our own food, so we employ a lot of people, and especially those first few months whenno one knew left from right and we didn't really know what covid wasand how to keep our team safe. But we had to continue operating tostay in business. Those are very, very difficult times. And on thesupply chain side as well, just getting product from our manufacturing partners overseas wasa huge challenge and maintaining inventory was hard. And then, similarly, on thefood side, prices for commodities were spiking, products for Shure, youknow, huge shortages, things like that that we're just unique challenge hinges wehadn't dealt with before. But from a demand standpoint it was great. TwoThousand and twenty we grew the business of ton. I've seen before where someenvironmental boon, environmental meaning like outside force, breaks it in your favor, inthe favor of a company, but they haven't solved the core issues.It can actually be one of the worst things that could possibly happen because theyputs everything on steroids for a brief period of time, but it's not sustainable. And to your point about like having solved the product market fit issue abeforehand. You know, you had a repeatable process, you had a sustainablebusiness model and then this just kind of put gas on the fire. IsOut of favorite characterization hunt. A hundred percent. A hundred percent. Soeverybody that we've ever had in the show that that is an entrepreneur has hadto solve some version of their company at one point was on the wrong sideof impossible. No company worth owning isn't in some way on the wrong sideof that line. Initially. You solve it. It's valuable. No oneelse has, you know, not at...

...your price point or in your wayor whatever. You can you talk about, for Tomala, what that's looked like, what you guys needed to solve. Could be software, hardware, culinary, it could be more than one thing, but what was one orsome of those things that you really needed to solve for to be here todayhaving the success you're having? So many it's a long list that. Yeah, I think the marketing one is the most black and white one, thatwe needed to figure out how to market the product. What was interesting isthe core product that we launched with worked really well and the product now isway, way better. But I think even that MVP would still be avery successful business from a just pure product Lens. We needed to build aton of infrastructure around it to support that. That has been challenging. You know, we produce a lot of meals every week now and building the operationaland supply chain expertise and perchuman expertise to do that on a week over weekbasis with a changing menu is very complicated and it's not something that is uniqueto us per se. There's other companies doing similar things. But that's ahugely complicated operation that has to work week over week and you know just thatthere cannot be a breakage there because our customers are expecting to get there arefood every single week. So you know, that was one area where when wefound product market fit, we weren't ready and it's you know, youtry to prepare but it's very hard to know at what point you're going tofind it, if ever, and when you do, what it's actually goingto mean. And it's funny, you know. We would put it intoour our investor presentations of we're going to grow this fast and this is whenit's going to happen, but you don't really know how you're going to findproduct market fit and until you do and what it's going to look like whenyou find it. And we found it and all of a sudden it waslike, okay, the hot potato has gone from the marketing team to theUPS team, the OPS team. We got to figure out how we're goingto fulfill all of these meals very quickly. And that's that's a human equation,like it's not. We're not trading in bits, like every customer thatwe add is more food that we have...

...to ship out of the facility.And and we were. We were caught a little flat footed there. Thatwas that was a big mistake in hindsight, and Hind Sight Two thousand and twenty, but that we didn't react quick enough of Oh my God, thishouse is on fire and it's just going to the fire is just going toget bigger unless we do everything we can to put it out. And eventuallywe did. But those are some painful months for some folks on our team. Operational issues. You know that they're they're always measured in months. Youknow you just went by the time you realize something's wrong. You've now discoveredwhere you're going to spend the next six months of your life focused on,or nine months or whatever. So you talked about hindsight being two thousand andtwenty. You know, always love to ask about these face palm allstar moments. Everybody's got them, the thing that you know you went for it andit just it just didn't go your way. was there like a time you cantell us about where you've had all this success but this particular thing wasjust a total fizzle, dud, something that hasn't gone you guys as way. Yeah, I'd say when we were searching for product market fit, wewere looking a lot at Peloton and Peloton's unlock was opening stores and malls andwe're like, okay, we should try that. And you know, sameissues, like people don't with the bike, like they don't know what makes itspecial. It's so expensive. They got to get on the bike,watch the take a class and then they get it and we're like Oh,the same thing is true with us. And no one believes the food isgoing to taste good. They don't understand how it's going to work, likewe just have to show it to them. And we had done a lot ofevents and things and the events felt good. People would give us goodfeedback, but we just weren't wired in a way where we were tracking thingseffectively to actually know, like what was the Roi on events like that?Was it actually working? And so we just came back to like hey,if we can't sell this thing in person, how are we ever going to sellit online? Like I'm sure this will definitely work. Let's let's sellin person, let's get a let's open a pop up and and we'll doa pop up so it'll be lower cost.

We could test it out and seehow it works, and so you we are still a small team.They were probably two thousand and twenty five of us, and so we openeda pop up the summer of two thousand and eighteen, I think, andit just was a flop, like it really didn't work for us. Wehad a ton of interest and foot traffic the first couple weeks and it wasmainly interest. We weren't moving that many units and then it just fizzled andit was a huge resource train because we needed to staff the place and getfood there on a regular basis and it was burning a hole in our pocketbecause we were like, well, we got to use it. If wehave the space, let's figure out how to maximize it. And in hindsightit we were way too early for something like that and it's interesting. Wecouldn't sell the product in person either, but I think it was for someof the reasons we talked about earlier, like we didn't have a coherent brandmessage. When folks left the pop up to go to our website, itwasn't a great flow and it was priced poorly and and all those things wereproblems in real life the same the same way they were just on our website. And Yeah, it was a problem. But even for the folks, andmost of our folks are still here, everyone still believes that a pop upwill work for us. It's just a matter of when is the righttime? Interesting. So it sounds like if you feel like if you hadsolved for that product market fit, the the pricing, some of those keylearnings, if you had already solved for that, maybe the pop up outcomewould have gone differently. A hundred percent. I think if we did a popup now it would probably work reasonably well. I don't actually think it'sthe right strategy in the near term, but I think it would work becausefor all the reasons we felt like it should work then. Those, Ithink, are still true, except now we actually know how to market andsell the thing. So, taking the last twenty five minutes of discussion,the key takeaways that to my mind, one, product market fit is crucial, something we talked about every week on the show. You know, Isee you nodding your head. I think everybody in tech is nodding their head. If you don't, if you're not aligned with your with your market,you're you're already dead. I like to...

...say if you have product market fit, nothing else matters and if you don't temp product market fit, nothing elsematters. That's right. Well, agree. The second thing you know that thatI think stands out from today is having like really effective cross disciplinary communications. We talked about it at the front side of the program but you've gotthree very different teams, much more different than I think many other companies would. Would maybe have, but every company will have some level of difference.It sounds like you guys have invited. You're being humble and saying you're notthe best, but it feels like you've made some investment in trying to getthat right. That difficult thing and that that that's been important to you guysas success and and then it feels like the third piece, which I guessis kind of almost nested under product market fit, is differentiation. You know. So you guys are not at all like Blue Apron. You know,there's a group of people that are not interested in learning how to cook,but they do want to eat well at home, and you're saying, Hey, we have you're a busy professional with your own thing going on and youwant to eat like you're eating out or eat like you made it yourself.You are the solution for those folks. Correct. Yeah, highly differentiated.So for the folks listening, it's it's Thanksgiving season. It's October for us, but they'll be hearing this in November. thanksgivings just around the corner. Whatwhat's next for you guys? What like, what can we see fromyou from Tovalla in the near future? What are you excited about? Whatwill they be seeing roll out or that would be interesting to know about.Yeah, so the holiday season is big for us. To all, isa great product, a gift to friends, parents, grandparents, children, anyonethat could use a more convenient, healthy home cooked option. Holidays aregreat time and, like a lot of businesses, we definitely run a coupleholiday promotions. So keep an eye out around Black Fridays is a great timeto watch for its of all eyes. One of the things I'd highlight forq four and and I'd say bigger picture...

...next year and moving on, thegoal is just to continue to build on top of the foundation we've got.So continue to add more items to the menu that appeal to a broader andbroader group, make the customer experience better and better than it is today andscale up the company. We need more facilities, a lot more people.We're hiring across lots of different functions and and really trying to go to thatnext level. Okay, I have follow up question. This was not inin the script at all, but so my seventy two year old father hishere visiting me right now. He texted me from the airport and he said, and this is something only baby boomers can get away with, he textedme, what is your phone number? Now what you think about that?Hey, this man texted me what is your phone number? And my questionto you is, would this be so that that's the level of Tech enablementthat I'm dealing with there. Would this be a good gift for somebody withthat level of Tech Savvy? Could could he operate this effectively? Do youthink so? Shockingly, the answer is yes. We have a ton ofcustomers that are seventy to nine years old, depending on their level of texophistication.Some of them can set up the product. It's pretty simple. Youdownload an APP, it automatically keys in your Wifi Information, it connects yourout and automatically. But even that, for for some is too much.In that situation it's generally the the children or the grandchildren that set up theoven and set up the subscription and then that's it. Making the actual mealsis very, very, very simple. The the instructions are written out veryplainly, not that complicated. Everyone can scan a bar code and once youlearn how to do it, once it's super simple. So the actual usageof the product is I'd say there's very few people in this country that couldnot figure out how to do it. The set up fifty and then theordering of the meals kind of depend. So we we order it for mywife's grandparents. We pick their meals, but but they do all the cookingthemselves. Okay, so for th those of you out there in TV Land, David doesn't know this yet, but...

...we're going to squeeze a discount codeout of him. We're going to publish it with this episode and if yougot parents out there and you want to buy this for them, just likeI am, will put something out there for you guys to make the purchase. So the other question I was always loved to ask people. David,your neck deep in the iote space. You know, we live it breathedas well. WHO's out there doing good work that the folks at home shouldknow about that? Maybe they don't right now. Somebody in the IOTE space. Yeah, one company were very close to and you friends with a lotof folks. There is a company, also based in Chicago called Farmers Fridgeand they've started to really expand their footprint across the country. But their corebusiness is making really healthy salads. They do some bowls, they do somebreakfast items and and the core initial product where these refrigerators, IOT connected refrigeratorsin airports, offices, hospitals. That are their beautiful vending machines and they'reall glass. You you look at them, you're like. You really want theproduct. It's very different than a typical vending machine you would look at. Product is made fresh every day, so it's an awesome product. Theyreally leverage internet connectivity to make those fridges work really well and part of whatthey've expanded into is distribution on a wider basis across the country. So farmersfridges is one that we love and, you know, encourage you to checkthem out as you're flying to different reports or if you find yourself in theMidwest. The last question, I have great conversation today. I think increasinglypeople care a lot about their food. For people out there that enjoyed whatthey've heard today, how can theyre's a good place to follow you? Followthe story, follow the Tovalla Story, follow the David Story. Yeah,I think a few places. I think for for for me, you know, following me on Linkedin is probably one good place for our brand. Instagramis the best place and from a product standpoint it's the website. And justto Vallacom okay, you heard it here. That's it for today. Folks.If you're listening on Apple Podcast,...

US to love it if you couldgive us a writing. My name is Ryan prosser. Thanks for listening.We'll see you guys on the Internet. You shouldn't have to worry about IOTprojects dragging on or unreliable vendors. You've got enough on your plate. Theright team of Engineers and project managers can change a pivotal moment for your businessinto your competitive edge varies. Close Knit crew of ambitious problem solvers, continuousimprovers and curious builders know how to turn your ideas into a reality on timeand up to your standards, with a focus on mitigating risk and maximizing opportunity, will help you build an Iot solution that you can hang your hat on. Let's bring your Iot idea to life. Learn more at very possiblecom. You'vebeen listening to over the Air Iot connected devices and the journey. Ifyou enjoyed today's episode, make sure to hit subscribe in your favorite podcast playerand give us a rating. Have a question or an idea for a futureepisode? Send it to podcast at very possiblecom see you next time.

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