Sustainability in the Robotics-as-a-Service Industry

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

For B2B robotics, all the customer cares about is the outcome. There’s no emotional attachment to having a brand new thing like there is in B2C.

That’s one reason why it provides an incredible opportunity to bring sustainability and reusability to the industry. 

All it takes is one simple acronym: RaaS.

Stefan Nusser, Chief Product Officer at Fetch Robotics, joins the show to discuss how his company approaches sustainability using a robotics-as-a-service model.

We discuss:

  • What made a partnership with Zebra Technologies so appealing
  • The difference between building a product for B2B vs B2C
  • The philosophy behind modular reusable components
  • How RaaS is bringing sustainability to robotics

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If you find the right early stagecustomer and that is going to allow you to find your horrid market fit right,if they're willing to sit by your side and help you so the shape theinnovation so that you know they can confirm it creates value, that's howyou find that product market fit. You are listening to over the Air Iotconnected devices and the journey brought to you by vary in each episode. We have sharpunfiltered conversations with executives about their IOT journeys,the mistakes they made, the lessons they learned and what they wish they'dknown when they started welcome back to over the Air Iotconnected devices and the journey. My name is Ryan Prosser, CEO, very andtoday were joined by Stephen Nezer S, chief product officer at Fetch,robotics we're going to be talking about sustainability in the robotics asa service industry, Stephen thanks for being on the show He Ryan it's great tobe here. Thanks for having me Yeah, you know I always keep people up and askthem to tell us a little bit about their company, but I understand thatwe're breaking some exciting news here today. We did our pre interview about amonth ago, but I understand just in the last few days. You guys are announcingthat you've been acquired. What can you tell us about fetch? What can you tellus about the acquisition? Give us a little background. Yeah I'll, be happyto talk about that. So we've been, we are now formally part of zerotechnologies. We've pre announced this I think a month ago and it closed threedays ago. So it's literally fresh off the press, I'm very excited about thispetabytes. That has been an independent venture on that company. For about sixyears, we've built collaborative for robots that are used primarilymanufacturing in logistics and supply chain and warehouses and and I'vealways felt Zebra has been an investing fetched in a partner of ours. We'veworked together, for you know, two years or so so, there's been, there'sbeen a lot of trust, there's a good understanding on both sides. What theother company does- and I'm really excited about this- I think the visitterrific home as a company Zebra caters to the same audience. They do Barcoskinners, they do wearable devices, they will print thus or for the samespace. But for where has this perfectors? They are very partnerfriendly. They have a very large part ecosystem. They literally with most ofthe muster patch. has there also customers of Zebra most of the partnersof many of the partners that fatch has been working with are also partners toZebra. So it really feels like we, we sort of getting if you want anamplification on the go to market site on the technology side, and that'sgreat- and I the other thing that that I really like about about that. Thatoutcome is Zuba a product company right and when you, when you think about howautomation gets brought to market today, a lot of it is custom right. It's aservice is deliverable, and so I'm...

...filled that we're part of a largerproduct or Nizain the spring strategy. The springs understanding the marketdeeply the spring set in methodical plant approach on how you put a productin the market because he expected to be general. This ation, you expect tobuild something once for many of your customers, and that is, it requires amindset that that we have a fetch and that I also see in sage. So I thinkit's an excellent outcome and I'm really happy that that's where we arenow very excited about what the next couple of years are going to break verycool. We have a podcast producer here. Theperson behind the show Kala that that helps make this show possible and sheworks so hard to put together these scripts and then I instantly throw imin the trash go off scripts. I was saying before the show, I'm even worsethan trump when it comes to staying on script, I would love to unpack whatmakes a good partner you know, but before we get into that, tell us alittle bit more about you. Guys as Corrodit, so let's, let's dive a littlebit more first into what you guys built. What some of the signals were, that youwere building the right things and things like that, and then I'd love tojust totally derail off script and talk about because this zebra news is hotoff the press, no time to prepare, but I'm very always very curious to learnwhat were the things that made this partnership, any partnership, but inthis case was zebra a winner, for you guys were were the synergies that youwere looking for and what that looked like, but yeah a that. That's actuallya great way to frame it. It's so let me start with our products right, so sofetch fetch is selling autonomous mobile robots, and so those arematerial moving robos, an a browes with arms. Then not roberts that look likehumans. There are words that are like platforms cards shelves right vehiclesthat they decided to move material in work with people right. So these AMRsare what we called collaborator onced. They are designed to work around peopleright, so you see them. For example, in the pick model where you haveassociates in workers, you know move around the robots. We have them infactories on a factory floor again, there's people people around the robotsis how the product is designed it. It's called the Calabrie pro but, and it is,it is the same to help workers be sort of focused on higher value, valuatethings right, so you can free up the time that people spend moving stuffaround can after a Bo. Do that and the the operator then has more time to doother things right to do things that are more complicated and create morevalue than just taking a cart and pushing it. You know up and down thewarehouse, and so the product is material moving robots. They come indifferent form factors I think, but of what distinguishes patch from some ofthe other players in the Amr space is we have a whole fleet, O Enomaus,ranging from one that moves about a hundred kilogram to one that was fivehundred Kirim to one there's, a ton and...

...a half right, so there's a whole rangeof material moving rowers there they're all connected to the cloud, so thereisn't a software component to them. It's very easy to deploy. It's notunusual for us to deploy a road like that in three days, and usually when wedo that we spent the third day. You know Lallish, transfer and teachingfolks rights. We get this up and running in a day or two, the reallyflexible, they're, easy ones. You have them to change and make them dodifferent things. It's a very flexible tool that helps the human worker in thefactory in the warehouse. You know freeze up some of their time so thatthey can focus on doing more important things that did not show this is sortof the value proposition of the fetch product line up. If you now look atwhat would see be, those is, their focus is devices that make the humanwork of opre right. So there is a focus on the Sebert with bark ood scanes,with work orchestration with all the variables and the devices that theyoffer to make warehouse workers more efficient, and that is why I think ifthis is a really good partnership right, there is a focus on our side inbuilding Rollos that collaborate with humans there's a focus on the severitein making those humans more efficient. It's by bringing those two perspectivestogether. You end up with a in more efficient collaboratively automatedwarehouse right where you get more value out of the humans, but it's stilla world in which the human work advises the process and rise, tic work. Youknow it's when a I don't know in high school or college or when young peopleare in that you know dating stage. There's often this question, Oh, whendid you notice me? You know and the other person I don't know you know.When did you think that I was something special? Can you pull back the onion? I'm sureyou would never have wanted to lay your cards out too early to Zebra, but nowthis is a. This is a done deal at what point? Did you guys look at Zebra andsay hey? This is a partnership that has real legs. We don't want to tip ourhand yet, but or maybe you did, but at what point did you guys say internally?This zebra thing is a partnership that makes a lot of sense. It couldpotentially go to the next level. You know, from my perspective very early onwhen we started collaborating right when you, when you part them when youwork together, then you learn about each other and it was. It was fairlyevident early on that that there is a isit perspective that we have. That's,that's really well aligned right worth, and I go back to what I said fiveminutes ago, we're both product companies and at it is a a mindsetright. It is the process of developing this strategy on the standing, themarket, developing a product, finding product markets to experimentinglearning. You know being articulated about the Australis and you assumptions.That is something that that fetches, a company that builds a hardware product.We have to do this a lot and zebe a company that builds harper products hasthe same mindset. Right. Zebras is very clear about that about this. Is that bevery clear about what space we want to...

...go in? How we want to create bell? Youverotik about that, and in that, in my mind, like that that main set theproduct mindset is what make me think from day one. You know this. This isripit right, they're, really good partner, because in a way you assessyour partners in the same way that you assess a potential acquirer it it. Itis always a per step to as potentially a deeper relationship of some kind, butan acquisition of peas, this or the end of their journey. But but you do you dobet, and you use. I ask you of these questions the moment you start partingring and it was like. It has been evident for me that there was reallygood alignment. You've mentioned claridy and focus or synonyms for thosea few times today. What did the product development process look like for youguys everybody I've ever talked to Ha. You know experiences. These bigfailures they go down. A path is quite right, so people are really comfortabletalking about of some people, not at all, but what did it looklike for youguys to land in a place where you've built a product that your partners loveyour customers, love solves important problems. You know what were some ofthe I don't know. Pit Falls along the way where you, what kind of went down apath and said? Okay, this you know, maybe they were false signals. Itlooked like you were going in a promising direction, only to need toback out. Can he talk about that a little bit absolute in and it's fetchwas head a product, but so that is that is pretty much the story of my life,but sure I've done part of development for probably fifteen twenty years right,so that that is. I can talk about that until you shot me down, it's a no likethat is in my mind what what it's all about like like? How do you find youknow? What's called parit market fit right like? How do you know you builtthe right thing? How can you find out as early as possible and it's to behonest, it's a humbling process. It is so in my mind. Let let me frind thisObol in my mind, is different for a ebb product right. So when you catering toenterprises, you work differently than when you cater to consumers and,ultimately, when you cater to enterprises, you have to learn a lotabout the domain that you're going into right. When you work on a consumerproduct, you know when you sign up. At the end of your day, you become aconsumer right, it's it's possible for you to have an intuition about aconsumer product, because you are a consumer right. I have never run away ahouse it. I have never run a factory. I've never run a FOMICATINmanufacturing operation right so I depend on learning in the market, soeverything everything is colored by the fact that we're building for it domainthat that were not native in and so as a fetch. Our our strength is technologyright, fetches, built on the foundation of the work that was done in Vilga rage,where the open source raw software lie was built with the early exploratorywork around collarit. For what was done, the founder of Fitch was the so thatthe lead of the robotics team at willow...

...so be be built on some of the shouldersof the work that was stomatella but be the foundation for a. We do istechnology for potic right. We to this day, we contribute to the open sourcecommunity. We have robes that we sell for researches, we steeped in thetechnology of robotics right. That is what's what's easy. What's natural forus right, the the language that you hear when you sit in the Fetia veteris,the language of for Polis? So now you say: Okay, how do I build a r? What isthe right to me for us to go into so you look at we where the pin pointswere t. This is the big pull for the kind of acknowledging when you settleon a domain, as we did with manufacturing and rocious legs, thenyou start asking yourself how can be contribute value right and now you gotto put yourself into the position of the customer right, the receivingcompany, and since you beat to be now, you start thinking about the return AlInvestment right like. How can I create bell? You have hosted milty pressure.What are the KBS, the petricks the customer cares about, and then, frankly,in my mind, you you try and get something into the hands of one ofthese customers as quickly as you can right. So you you have to find thepilot customer. That's that's willing to engage early stage, there's a lot ofhit to miss. There's a lot of luck, but if you find the right early stagecustomer and that is going to allow you to find your pored market fit right ifthey're willing to sit by your side and help you so the shape innovation, sothat you know they can confirm it creates value. That's how you find thatproduct market fit right and from that moment on its trial and there right you,you build partnerships with o the stage customers. You build good relationships,you iterate as quickly as you can, and if your product has a hardwarecomponent, that makes a little bit more interesting right because it is easierto iterate on software than it is to iterate on hardware. Then again,there's ways: There's ways to sort of mitigate it right. You can make yourheart reflexible! You can make your harper programmable in our ms all likethat right. So it's it's possible for us to update the programming on therobot in begins, iterate on the hardware by reprogramming the hardwareright, so there's the tricks there, but fumant. The tourney is one ofexperimentation of trial there in the gradually you sort of shape thatproduct you have a hypothesis. This is how I got a great value. You work withthat pilot customer to confirm that your Harotea comes through you recordthe second and the third customer, and then at some point you have that thatsort of confidence that you've created a good general ization because that'sultimately Bo the product is it's a general ization right. So you doingsomething for one customer is not enough and you have to do it in such away that you can lift it and move it over to customer two in customer three,and then that would be good evidence that the Shan versation is good andthen I think you sort of you've got growing confidence as you on the rightpath. You know hearing you talk about your product market fit process. Itsounds so similar to the scientific method. H, you know, have a hypothesistest, the hypothesis, I repeat repeat...

...repeat it- is that I mean have youdeliberately kind of thought for hey? I recognized this process. I you knowknow this from a previous chapter of my career. It sounds like you have kind ofdeliberately built your process that way it is certainly inspired that ithas. It has a sort of a social and the net colonly component and, of course,in the social scientist, that's part of the scentin process, but that, if you,when you say santificame, you thinking the you know, physics, the naturalsciences, where everything is hard facts, you have additional dimensionhere that you're working with people right it's bee to be, but when you'rebuilding a Pardu for beat to see, then then your customers, you know if it's.If it's a you know a cloud based product, your customers may be in themillions right, and you may think about the new dum of statistics when you workwith end of ours customers. You have relationships right in that that, forme that adds another dimension right, because because there are thesequantitate as space, but then there's also the qualitative ones like how? Howcan you connect with that customer? How do you reach that customer at thusdeparted? Need explaining? How do you get the right? You know what I like tocall consulted. If delivery right some some products, don't just get come,figured on the website and ship out right. They need to be explained, theyneed to be customers, and so so it has that that that people in relationship Imentioned in, of course, the Etomami dimension it you got to create value.You mentioned open source earlier. I know another piece of the puzzle youguys are passionate about is modularity and building robots that have you know,sort of modular reusable component pieces. Can you talk about you guysthis philosophy there and then I know you know what's coming next. I want toknow- and I ask this a lot- why, in the world, isn't the consumer side doingthe same thing? Why are my Sono speakers closed black boxes with zero,reusable components, and yet they cost eight hundred dollars and have a veryshort fixed life? The speaker will not work in three years. Talk about you,guys, philosophy and then let's, let's poke it consumer a little bit with metoday, yeah I'll be happy to so. So let me start with wet sort of theinterpested when you built the ithe economics of different. I think that'stenament ally is the the ansered the language. When you build a product formillions and millions of customers, rathe economist, the economies of scaleare so powerful that it makes sense to you to build the one size fits all andthat one size fits all. Them is going to good components that aren't alwaysused read. I have I have a wonderful MECCO here. It has a powerful graphicto a celebrator. I only run by Red Browser on this. This notebook everrightly, but it doesn't make sense for the manufacturer of that of that leftappear to create a version bitin the version without gravic accelerator, theeconomist, a skill, a sad that it makes more sense to build a one size fits allnow, both the fact that we be to be in the fact that that robotics estechnology is different than semi...

...combated. A lot of time when, when yousay product, I think your visualizing, something that has the same microtapesright like just on the speaker, but rowers are a little different. Theyhave models, they have. They have components that interact with thephysical world and the one size fits. All approach is much harder to do theirright building. You know it is. It is not true that you build a robot thatcan pol five hundred killograms and it's a good pit for everything up tofive founded kilogram, radically. Ten and twenty and thirty red a robot,that's built to move two thousand, a thirty kilogram is going to lookdifferent right. I wobert and and you're going to have many morerequirements to meet when you built one that most five hundred kilogram right.So it's going to be a very different animal and it just isn't an option todecide a one size fits all in for everyone who wants to move just totwenty Calaghan say: Hey use the big one in just don't use the next ooAbasit and the same thing is true for the skin, for example. Right, if youwant a robot that is war Opro, then that's usually a separate, a separatemodel right. So the economics drive these decisions in what you see in withrobots in the Pete Pace. is you see choices? You see more special purposedesigns that are built for certain environments. You know one for cleanroom, one for outdoors one, for you know food and those type ofenvironments on for very hot environment. So you have the economic dictates. Youknow some level of specialisation right, and so that's why you see a whole lineup of robots in our portfolio. Yea talking about sustainability, I thinkagain, the the bet space is different than the Pizza C space right, the theINTERVISCERAL N my mind is driven by an ry. Primarily there isn't so the deemotional component of ownership in o owning a new thing right, so the behave a program that allows our customers to get robes as e sserviceand it's called Rass, and instead of buying the robot outright and owning itfor the duration of the life of the robot, the useful life span of themachine. You rented basically for a certain period of time, and you get alot of flexibility. You get a single rate. You can grow that foot bring bitsif you, if you sort of, have five reseravit and you want an extra five,it's very easy to grow. If you want the next door three over four months of theyear, there is search pricing models that be used for that, as it gives thecustomer flexibility its attractive. What it essentially means that we'repromising the customer in outcome right, you get the capability to move the Palothat you want to move in the own, the keeping the machine running that that'sit right, and so, if the custom is done with that Roll Ber, then they give itback to us. We refer Bishan. We give it to the next customer right and sincethe customer wants the outcome, the service, they don't care about gettinga new robot, but it's not emotionally about only a new thing. It's aboutgetting an outcome. I can move a...

...hundred kilogram. You know a thousandtimes a day from it to be, and we essentially guarantee that, because we keep the machine running andbe maintained and we replace the parts that we are out and I rowood reaches inthe life we take it back. We put the new one in and so on. Right customerdoesn't have to worry about that at all. So I think the Ras model on the Bobside, on the other per side is, is a good step, an important step to atsustainability, and that's part of the motivation for why? Why we're doing it?We don't like robots that don't run right, be you know a apt, dvisementmanufacturer may not may not dislike you having. You know the previousgeneration of a product in maybe two generations of a product sitting on theshelf somewhere right, but be do not like Roberts that sit somewhere and donot run. You want our rowers to be moving. I do not like it when I visit acustom, I don't I do not like seeing a or war. That's not moving. My firstquestion is hey. What did you get? This word word, for why is it not movingright? So I see the the rest, the assortis model asa way to drive up the utilization of the Roberson the field. I want to dragyou back to consumer for a second and and like continue to push you outsideof your comfort zone and then, when we have considered vice manufactures onthe show. Of course, we have them talk about robotics and we like to keepeverybody off balance here and over there. So one of the things we do avery is you know, will do a lot of the apt development. The firmware work likea lot of the work related to the ongoing maintenance and improvement ofindustrial, commercial, but also consumer grade electronics, like atelevision. If you have a connected television and one of our clients is,you know one of the largest television manufacturers in the world. We make thesoftware that gets pushed to their devices for the first time. You know ifyou bought a team, if you bought a RCA, remember RCA. If you bought a RCAtelevision in the s which was you know, state of the art, twenty seven inchcolor television when you bought that television, that was the end of thetransaction it maybe you bought an extended warranty, but I don't eventhink that was a thing they sold back then so buying that television was theend of the transaction. They got all the money they were going to get fromyou and they were done servicing or putting money into that television.They weren't pushing updates out now you've got firm where you've got. Youknow different, APP updates that need to be made to you know. So I don't knowI think iphone is probably still supporting like the iphone seven ornine fund and six, but they don't support the iphone three they'lldecommission that less say we're done supporting that device. A part of thatis they're, saying: Hey. We're done incurring cost relative to that legacy,piece of equipment. So now you're. Looking at a market where you know atelevision can be aged out of existence because they're not going to ship, theupdates required to keep it functioning. Do you think that that's going to pushconsumer devices in a direction of this...

...as a service model that we've seenelsewhere, where they say, Hey, you're, just going to rent the hard work fromus, we're going to keep it operational for a period of time and then ratherthan decommissioning and giving you this terrible experience? We're justgoing to replace it with the next thing, and maybe your rate of pay changes? Doyou think that's a direction were headed, I think so, and it's actuallyand being you know off the cuff, since I'm outside of my confisum, I thinkactually it's an exciting opportunity that comes out of the fact that you'redeveloping a relationship with the manufacturer of the device right. Sothe more the value isn't encapsulated in the TV you bought the more thevalues encapsulated in a relationship with the provider, but the more itbecomes a service right, the SERVITII of the product. I think it's the trendthat opens the door for eventually saying hey. You know it sounds like atransition, a very long grane transition rat from in the old days. Itwas you get a product s and you forget about what the manufacture was rightand now it is. You have a relationship with that manufacture. It you. I have A.I have a sense on TV. I have a sense of God account right so to gradually I'mbuilding a relationship and, of course the manufacture wants that right. Themanufacture, but learns were about me. The manufacturer can shift from sellinga piece of hardware to selling and experience that's a little more tailed,and I think one effect of that is going to be that eventually the hardware isgoing to diminish in the significance of the overall experience, and I seeperfectly possible that you're going to be able to return the hard wind get anew one, but it's going to cost you a little bit right. It's not going to bea seamless say, send me now to be, but it becoming a relationship with themanufacturer it becoming a service opens the door, I think form moresustainable model yeah. I think it's such an interesting time. I thinkthere's a very high probability that people are going to look back from thevantage point of two thousand and thirty and view two thousand and twentyone as unrecognizable from a consumer perspective, one of the things we don'thave time to talk about today and it was a huge part of the program and theZebra announcement took its its slot. But was this idea of electronic wasteyou know and how you guys at fetch have worked really hard to ensure orseemingly at least from the research we've done to ensure minimal to zerowaste? Things are reusable they're re purposal. You know we're, obviously notat all, seeing that on the consumer side, but talk just briefly. If you canabout how you got you said he o a robot that isn't moving. Is a robot, that'snot being fully utilized talk about a robot that whose function maybe it hasevolved, and how do you what's your viewpoint on that excellent questionright, so the role was think of the robe as as a computer with wheels right.So that's that's how programmable these these devices are right, so be, youthink, think of Fitch as a software company right well we're eighty percentsoftware, twenty percent hardware it...

...something like that. So there's there'sconstantly people who were building new capabilities for this role was theyallow them to interact with new devices? The embire right? I will tease thetheme of the show where you know interacting with devices in theenvironment of the robot and riches, the capabilities, and so with asoftware update. A robot can suddenly interracial a roll up door with aconveyor right. Those those kind of capabilities can be released assoftware updates and so having a harder platform. That's literally a platform,something that you can add new and additional capabilities for you open upthe possibility that you can. You can augment the functionality on the fire,and that in turn means that, if, for whatever reason, the original productis no longer useful with software, you can add new capabilities that arehopefully going to make it more useful or useful in different ways. But it'sanother way to making sure it's another way to make sure that that Robertdoesn't doesn't so that end up in the court in a collecting dust. So lastquestion for you. This will be. This will be the curve ball of curve ballsgood. So you know for listeners out there. Most people are not watchingthis on video they've no doubt detected a lovely Austrian accent, the mostfamous Austrian of all. Of course, the high point of his career was spentbattling against the robots. What can you tell us as the second most famousAustrian, what are some of the things you're most hopeful about in the comingdecade that we're going to see from robots and robotics? Not necessarilyyou know, Zebra and fetch related, although certainly would love to hearmore about what's coming down the pipe for you guys, but what are some thingstowards the end of this decade? That you're really excited about that? Youthink more than make up for rising threat of the the robots rising upagainst us. What are some things to be excited about? I think sense. Sense of technologies havebeen sort of the wave t t t that's given momentum to rob, odit less tinges,and I think that's the space that everyone's parching read. I'm curiousto see what's happening with Ladas, I'm curious to see what's heavening, whichwe de Cameras Right, also kind of the two ways our robots see the better. Weget it collecting that they produce the heart persons or technology itself, thebetter we get at interpreting that they, which is the whole space of you, know,machine learning and other statistical methods to be used to make sense ofthat data like that is going to create a machine. That's going to beincreasingly verse a Tou Right, so I prefer artobane and not the terminator,but a that kineas as in particular right going to becomemore versatile and that again right, that's going to allow them to do morein different things and it's going to make them more flexible right. So fromthe ZEP perspective, I think what what what I'm really excited about here isin the section between the robot and Inditin Wan Workers Right our robots, abuild as a collaborative device. Se Be...

...has a lot of experience in in enablinghuman workers to be very efficient to do you newent a new things and increasepolitiely in so that intersection in specifically orchestrating across bothof these worlds. I think this were a lot of really interesting opportunity.Dese. Let me give you an example that we we have robbers and pick modils,doing, order ful film and read something you click on an order in youronline shopping site rid some. Some some human worker collects these itemsand put some on the box for you and ships the mad and those many timesthose people work with robots. So Roberts in pick modules, is one of thethe or the very hot trends here for the last couple of years, but you have alsomachines and big bodies. You have people on four cliffs right: The peakmodule is notest the ground level stuff. It's also the high level storage, whereyou have the cases that you used to be plainish to material in the big modules.So how do you coordinate work processes across people in for clifts and peoplethat work with robots right today? Those are silent right. The people thatwork with roll words are sort of you know working optimized by a softwaresoftware component, but it's in the CIBOT right. The people that work infor cliffs they're also using devices the using sebatise and in yet theydon't know about where the robots are, and they don't know what the next thingis that they're always going to do now. I Matin a system that knows about whatthe people in the four cooks are going to do. What the people with the oatsare going to do, and then also what the people with the cars and the people inPackard are going to do right. If you gradually get the ability to connect inan instrument and automate and optimize marches, the collarit robes, but alsothe people that do who work. And then you can that's a space where you see alot of value, so that's I'm excited about the human workers, the variabledevices in the collarit of automation, STOPPING TO BE SITOS and starting totalk to each other. So Stephen, next time we have you on the show. I want toask you to start by playing the other side of that and answering the question.You know: If we're not careful, robotics will dot dot dot and talkingabout you know some of the things that concern you with maybe technology goingtoo far or developing along the wrong evolutionary peaks, but for now, as wemove to rap, what's next for fetch, what's next for Zebra, this willprobably go to air some time in October. What can folks expect to see from youguys in the months that roll on from there you're going to see US start toexplore these these intersections being workers with variable devices andcollaborate? Rol Words? Are you going to see us so the ad capabilities to thevalable devices that allow work at t easily call a robot and then you'regoing to see us go into sort of orchestrated work flows where you knowthe workers player roll in the roles playworld and the coordination happensacross both the human component and the machine component, and that's that'sthe space that we're we're really excited about, and that's where weanxious to go to that's fantastic, and I know you like myself are a big fan ofthe IOT space. Generally, we always...

...love to plug the underdogs on the showwho's, doing good work out there that you think not enough people are talkingabout all right. I got one for you, it's not it's, not a B TC it play. Iyou know the company that continues to impress music right is a sickmanufactures. The latest canes that I don't know role word cane and it spellthat force sick as a scant German sensor. Sense of technology ismanufacturer and they built a really cool. I gateway box and it's around athousand dollars. It is a essentially the sign for an industrial environment.I magine like a blue box, it's got a WIFI connection, it's got an Ethernetconnection and then it has all the analog and digital and the industrialconnections that you need hook it up to any kind of equipment where it's a door,a conveyer, a sensor. Anything you want to get an input from or actuate in anindustrial environment. The sick allows the sick TC is that gateway component.It allows you to cloud connect that device right. So if you have an airshower- and you wanted to pop up in your cloud orchestrated middle- wherethe stds is what you want to use right and we are fully integrated the sittsand it allows the rous interact with the environment in any way, you canimagine all right fucks. He heard it here. First big over there tip of theCAP to the folks sit sick. So this is the last episode of Season One. So ifyou've been following the show, everyone welcomed to the end of season,one were to be kicking off season to shortly last question. So for folksthat have enjoyed the episode today, they want to keep up with your story.How can the folks out there and TV land keep up with stuffing so find me I'mlinked in, and I am a huge in person fan, find me at Motel promit I meet anyof the trade shows. Let's go ever bear let's go over coffee, but lengthen isthe way to sort of get up dates on on what I'm up to cool and that's Stephannewse can see it in both. In the the title of the episode, Stephen Spelled:Ste Fan Newsen. U S S! Er He's on linkedin check him out, that's it fortoday, folks, and that is it for season one. It's been a journey, both it andthis podcast. We appreciate you guys sticking with us. My name is Ryanprosser. If you have an idea for a topic or a guest, please reach out onLindon. We are currently loading up. Our guest roster for next season wouldlove to hear from you. That's it for today, thanks for listening, we'll seeyou guys on the Internet. You shouldn't have to worry about IOTprojects dragging on or unreliable vendors. You've got enough on yourplate. The right team of Engineers and project managers can change a pivotalmoment for your business into your competitive edge. Various close knitcrew of ambitious problem, solvers, continuous improvers and curiousbuilders know how to turn your ideas into a reality on time and up to yourstandards, with a focus on mitigating...

...risk and maximizing opportunity willhelp you build an Iot solution that you can hang your hat on. Let's bring yourIot idea to life, learn more at very possible com. You've been listening toover the Air Iot connected devices and the journey, if you enjoy to day'sepisode, make sure to hit subscribe in your favorite podcast player and giveus a rating. Have a question or an idea for a future episode. Send it topodcast at very possible com. See you next time. I.

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